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Dentist with free parking in Bristol at the Nuffield hospital in Clifton for your routine dental care

These days, people use the word ‘routine’ to mean dull, but the team here at CK Dental in Bristol knows that routine dentist appointments can save everyone a lot of time, money and most of all pain.

How often should I visit the dentist?

This varies from person to person – some of our Bristol patients need check-ups as frequently as every three months, others can get away with popping in once every year or two – but you can’t make that call yourself.

How frequently you need to see the dentist depends on your general oral health, and the only person who can assess that is your dentist. Brushing and flossing regularly and avoiding sugary foods are all good practice, but they can’t provide any guarantee of good teeth and gum health. Generally we advise that you visit our Bristol clinic for a check-up every six months, to ensure that nothing gets missed and that any problems get nipped in the bud before they escalate.

What will the dentist do at my check-up?

At a routine examination, your Bristol dentist will examine your teeth and gums, ask questions about your oral hygiene routine and eating habits, and offer advice on how to maintain good oral health.

A dental check-up can not only help you avoid the inconvenience of fillings, crowns and other expensive dental work, but can also detect serious gum disease and mouth cancer at an early stage, which can make it much easier to treat.

How is that different from a hygiene appointment?

Dental hygienists perform preventative work, so they will give your teeth a thorough clean – often known as a ‘scale and polish’, and give you advice on how to avoid plaque. This is really important as a top-up to whatever you are doing at home – it is very difficult to achieve such a thorough clean yourself.

If you’re not sure when you last had a routine dental examination, give our Bristol clinic a call now to make an appointment.

The British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) has recently joined the groups calling for fruit juice to be removed from the list of recommended five-a-day portions. According to the official list, a 150ml glass of unsweetened fruit juice counts towards your five a day, but dentists – including Bristol dental surgeon Cornelius Krause of CK Dental – say that even unsweetened juices can be harmful to oral health.

At a time when many children as young as three are showing visible signs of tooth decay, the BDHF believes that keeping fruit juice on the five-a-day list sends out the wrong message to parents and children.

What’s wrong with drinking juice?

Many parents who we see here at our Bristol clinic say they give their children fruit juices to drink as an easy way to increase their fruit consumption, but the high concentration of sugars and acids in juices means that they can cause damage to the teeth, particularly when sipped repeatedly throughout the day.

What should children drink instead?

According to the British Dental Health Foundation, water and milk are the best drinks you can give to children. If they really insist on drinking fruit juice, try to keep it to mealtimes, when the mouth is producing more saliva to help wash the sugars away from the teeth.

How can we limit the damage caused by drinking fruit juice?

Any dentist will tell you how important it is to ensure that children brush their teeth for two minutes, twice a day. This is particularly important when the child drinks a lot of fruit juice, or eats a high sugar diet.

It is worth remembering, however, that brushing teeth too soon after consuming sugary food or drink can actually do more harm than good, as sugars soften the enamel on the teeth – try to leave a good half hour before tooth brushing.

For more detailed advice on how to care for your children’s teeth, book an appointment with dental surgeon and cosmetic dentist Mr Krause, here at our clinic in Bristol.

January is a time of year when we all resolve to turn over a new leaf and look after ourselves a little better, so this year why not start with your teeth? Here are some ideas from the team at our Bristol clinic, to get you thinking…

Floss every day

Everyone resolves to floss straight after a visit to the dentist, when all that build-up has been scraped from between your teeth, but that resolve often falls by the wayside a few days in. Why not make this the year you actually stick to it?

Cut down on sugary food and drink

It’s unrealistic to expect yourself never to eat another chocolate again, but dentists recommend that you try to keep the sugar consumption to mealtimes.

Drink more water

This is a great all-rounder – not only will drinking more water keep you more alert, but drinking a glass of water after you’ve eaten can help rinse away anything that is potentially damaging to your teeth.

Brush for two minutes, twice a day

As adults, most of us do manage to brush our teeth twice a day, but do you really stick to the recommended two-minute minimum? There are a number of apps you can download on your phone to help with this one – ask your dental surgeon to recommend one, or you can buy an egg timer.

Get a whiter smile

If you’re embarrassed by the colour of your teeth – perhaps you’ve given up smoking as one of your other new year’s resolutions (if not, we highly recommend that you do!) and want to get rid of any tell-tale signs that you were ever in the habit – consider booking an appointment with a cosmetic dentist like Mr Krause here at CK Dental in Bristol, who can perform a tooth whitening procedure to leave your smile brighter than ever before.

Visit the dentist regularly

Even if you can’t manage all of the suggestions above, making regular trips to the dentist can help to keep tooth decay at bay.

Happy New Year from all the team here at Bristol Dentists CK Dental!

Did you know that the consequences of poor dental hygiene could go far beyond tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath, leading to more serious diseases.

At CK Dental in Bristol, specialist dentist Cornelius Krause offers patients a thorough oral examination at every visit, to help keep tooth and gum problems at bay, but this does need to be complemented by good oral hygiene at home, which means brushing thoroughly twice a day.

What problems can be caused by poor dental hygiene?

Alzheimer’s Disease

A study carried out by researchers from New York University (NYU) in 2010 suggested that there is a link between gum inflammation and Alzheimer’s. This was supported by research performed by the University of Central Lancashire in 2014.

Pancreatic Cancer

In 2007, researchers from Harvard School of Public Health reported a strong link between the gum disease periodontitis and pancreatic cancer. A follow-up study found that men with a history of gum disease had a 64% increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to men who had never had gum disease.

Heart Disease

A 2008 study conducted jointly by research teams from the University of Bristol and the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin, Ireland, found that bleeding gums can increase the risk of heart disease.

According to the research, the risk is increased because when the gums bleed, bacteria from the mouth is able to enter the bloodstream, sticking to platelets and potentially causing clots, which can then lead to a heart attack.

How can I reduce the risk to me?

Firstly, you can book an appointment at CK Dental in Bristol, to see specialist dentist Mr Krause, who will examine your teeth and gums to check for any signs of existing gum disease. At home, Bristol dental surgeon Mr Krause recommends brushing your teeth for two minutes, twice daily, flossing daily and rinsing with mouthwash to keep teeth and gums clean and healthy.

Bristol dental clinic CK Dental is pleased to announce that we now offer Under Armour Performance Mouthwear – mouthguards custom fit by the dentist, which are designed to maximise your sporting performance whilst also protecting your jaw.

How does it work?

The Under Armour mouthguards use patented ‘Power Wedges’, positioned between the molars, to stop you clenching your jaw – a natural reaction when playing sport.

What’s wrong with clenching your jaw?

Dentists see hundreds of patients who have problems related to bruxism (that’s tooth grinding or jaw clenching). These can range from headaches and aching jaws to cracked teeth and receding gums.

One more serious issue is neuromuscular imbalance, which can cause back pain, scoliosis and tinnitus, as well as many other issues. Under Armour Performance Mouthwear has been proven to help reduce the symptoms of neuromuscular imbalance.

What are the benefits to me?

A number of scientific studies have been carried out on Under Armour mouthguards, uncovering – among others – the following benefits:

  • Improved oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange, leading to improved performance
  • Reduced cortisol levels (allowing your muscles to repair faster)
  • Improved airway openings
  • Improved reaction time

Isn’t this only for professionals, or those involved in contact sports?

No! Studies have shown that Under Armour mouthguards can help participants in any sport, including:

  • Cycling
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Hockey
  • Rugby
  • Running
  • Tennis
  • Weight lifting
  • Yoga and pilates
How do I get a mouthguard fitted?

Just book an appointment at our Bristol Clinic, where our dental surgeon Mr Krause will make an impression of your mouth. This will then be sent off to the ArmourBite lab, where your own personal mouthguard will be made. A follow-up appointment with the dentist will be scheduled, when you will receive your finished mouthguard.

For more information, please contact us.

The holidays are coming and for many of us that means an abundance of sweet treats and overindulgence in both food and drink. We don’t want to spoil anyone’s fun, but any dentist will tell you that Christmas is a danger time for oral health, as people tend to let good habits slide for the festive season.

In order to help you keep your teeth healthy while still enjoying yourself, the team here at Bristol dentists CK Dental has come up with some top tips:

Tip #1: Keep sweet treats for mealtimes

Don’t deny yourself a sugar hit, but try to save it for post dinner; if your mouth is already producing saliva, it will do a better job of protecting your teeth, as saliva helps to neutralise acid and wash away food remnants. Get the kids into the habit of this in the run-up to Christmas, by only letting them open the advent calendar immediately after breakfast!

Tip #2: Drink tap water

We all know it’s important to stay hydrated, but did you know drinking water can also help keep trips to the dentist to a minimum? Have a glass of water straight after indulging in anything sugary, and it will help to wash away the sugars coating your teeth, which can eventually cause decay. The fluoride found in tap water can also help to protect your teeth.

Tip #3: Wait half an hour before brushing your teeth

When you’ve eaten something sweet, the urge to brush your teeth straightaway can be overwhelming, but sugars soften the enamel of the teeth and if you brush immediately you can end up eroding the enamel away. GDC-registered dentist Mr Krause advises waiting at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth after eating something sweet.

We hope this advice helps you to enjoy the festivities without worrying about the damage you are doing to your teeth – and if you do slip up, don’t panic, just book an appointment at our Bristol clinic in the new year!

Merry Christmas from all of us here at CK Dental!

The prognosis for mouth cancer is usually very good, so long as it is diagnosed early. So what are the early signs to look out for? Bristol dental surgeon Cornelius Krause advises patients to be on the look out for the following symptoms:

Danger signs

  • A mouth ulcer that does not heal within three weeks
  • White patches anywhere in the mouth (this is known as leukoplakia)
  • Red patches anywhere in the mouth (known as erythroplakia)
  • Numbness or bleeding in the throat
  • Pain when chewing or swallowing
  • A sensation that there is something stuck in the throat
  • A lump on the lip or tongue, or in the mouth or throat
  • Loose teeth or dentures not fitting properly
  • A lump in the neck
  • A change to your voice

Which are the most common symptoms of mouth cancer?

The most common indicators of oral cancer are pain in the mouth that does not go away, or a sore or ulcer in the mouth that does not heal. The important thing is to be aware of any changes in your mouth and to see a dentist regularly, as they will be able to detect any warning signs as well as keeping an eye on your general oral health.

What should I do if I think I have one or more of these symptoms?

Firstly, don’t panic. All of these problems can be related to other conditions, or could be entirely benign. If you are displaying any of these symptoms however, it is important to get it checked out by a dentist, such as Mr Krause, who offers thorough dental examinations here at our Bristol clinic.

If you are concerned that you or someone you know may be showing early signs of mouth cancer, please contact us to make an appointment with dental surgeon Mr Krause in Bristol.

Symptoms of mouth cancer can appear on the lips, tongue, gums and cheek, in the form of ulcers which do not heal in three weeks, red and white patches, or unusual swellings in the mouth, head or neck. Early detection is crucial to survival, so it is important to visit your dentist regularly.

How can my dentist detect early signs of mouth cancer?

At CK Dental in Bristol, dental surgeon Cornelius Krause performs a thorough examination at every check-up, to look for early signs of mouth cancer. As part of the examination at his Bristol clinic, dentist Mr Krause will look at six key areas:

  • The head and neck, to check for any asymmetry in the form of lumps, bumps or swelling
  • The lips, to seek out any sores, lumps, bumps or changes in texture or colour
  • The inner cheeks, looking for red, white or dark patches, lumps or ulcers
  • The roof of the mouth, where there may be lumps or changes in colour that would be indicative of early stage mouth cancer
  • The tongue, checking for swelling or changes to the colour or texture of the surface
  • The floor of the mouth, where the specialist dentist will look for lumps, swellings or colour changes

If you’re concerned about mouth cancer, or think you may display some of the symptoms listed above, dentist Mr Krause can help to put your mind at rest. At his clinic in Bristol, Mr Krause offers the very latest in dental technology together with a calm and gentle approach, to provide complete reassurance for his patients.

Remember: “If in doubt, get checked out”. If you are concerned and need more information, click on www.mouthcancer.org.